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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

7 edition of Complex demonstratives found in the catalog.

Complex demonstratives

a quantificational account

by Jeffrey C. King

  • 120 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by MIT Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Grammar, Comparative and general -- Demonstratives.,
  • Grammar, Comparative and general -- Quantifiers.,
  • Reference (Linguistics)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJeffrey C. King.
    SeriesContemporary philosophical monographs ;, 2
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsP299.D46 K56 2001
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 207 p. ;
    Number of Pages207
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6788930M
    ISBN 100262611694, 0262112639
    LC Control Number00048174

    Complex Demonstratives 70 - Oxford Scholarship This chapter provides an analysis of complex demonstratives, constructed from a demonstrative and a nominal, such as ‘that man’ or ‘that politician’.   Since the late s, the orthodox view of complex 'that' phrases (e. g., 'that woman eating a granola bar') has been that they are contextually sensitive devices of direct reference. In Complex Demonstratives, Jeffrey King challenges that orthodoxy, Brand: CSJ King Publishing.

    Complex demonstratives are linguistic expressions of the form “that N ” or “this N ”, where N is a common noun phrase (an NN or NP, according to some syntactic frameworks). Examples include ‘this table’ and ‘that man in a blue shirt’. 1 They are called ‘complex. In a recent book, Jeffrey King (King ) argues that complex demonstratives, i.e., noun phrases of the form ‘this/that F ’, are not singular terms. As such, they are not devices of direct reference contributing the referent to the proposition expressed.

    The claim is that complex demonstratives are rigidly referring expressions, just like simple demonstratives (for example, ‘this’, ‘that’, ‘those’, ‘these’), but unlike them they exhibit some semantic structure. 4 It is not, however, that Neale was not aware of the possible counterexamples when proposing NPT, but rather he viewed. and complex demonstratives in a unified manner, King's arguments have particular bite. King himself is well aware of this. At the end of the book, he urges that simple demonstratives should be treated along with complex demonstratives and not as devices of direct reference. That would leave.


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Complex demonstratives by Jeffrey C. King Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this extremely clear and closely argued book, Jeffrey C. King claims that the majority view is mistaken: Complex demonstratives (and probably free standing ones) are quantifiers. King's view is ingenious, accounting for both the uses of demonstratives which have led Complex demonstratives book and others to take them to be devices of direct reference, as well as more obviously quantificational by: In Complex demonstratives book Demonstratives, Jeffrey King challenges that orthodoxy, showing that quantificational accounts not only are as effective as direct reference accounts but also handle a wider range of providing arguments against direct reference accounts of 'that' phrases and developing a quantificational theory of them, King looks at the interaction of 'that' phrases with modal operators.

"The book contains a thorough account of the controversy over the semantics of complex demonstratives, and advances a sophisticated positive theory that will interest everyone working on the semantics of natural language."--Graeme Forbes, Department of Philosophy, Tulane University "In this extremely clear and closely argued book, Jeffrey C.

King claims that the majority view is mistaken: Complex demonstratives 4/5(1). In Complex Demonstratives, Jeffrey King challenges that orthodoxy, showing that quantificational accounts not only are as effective as direct reference accounts but also handle a wider range of data.

Complex demonstratives, that is, noun phrases of the form 'that F', have received particular attention in recent times largely because it has been thought that they pose problems for the traditional account of direct reference, inaugurated by David Kaplan ('Demonstratives', manuscript, ; published.

Complex Demonstratives: A Quantificational Account Jeffrey C. King, Complex Demonstratives: A Quantificational Account. complex; reference; argument; account; event; Related Book Chapters. The Tyranny of the Widget An American Medical Aid Organization’s Struggles with Quantification.

Accountability. Student by: My book Complex Demonstratives: A Quantificational Account argues against what I call the direct reference account of complex demonstratives (henceforth DRCD) and () defends a quantificational account of complex demonstratives. Complex demonstratives, expressions of the form 'That F', 'These Fs', etc., have traditionally been taken to be referring terms.

Yet they exhibit many of the features of quantified noun phrases. Demonstratives can make the most complex set of facts more easily understood.

As zealous advocates, we owe it to our clients to think creatively and help solve their problems with every tool at our disposal, especially the most powerful ones.

This book will help all of us achieve that goal. (demonstrative pronoun) That book is good. (demonstrative adjective + noun) Normally we use demonstrative pronouns for things only. But we can use them for people when the person is identified.

Look at these examples: This is Josef speaking. Is that Mary. That sounds like John. There are also plural complex demonstratives such as `these skis' and `those snowboarders smoking by the gondola'.

My book Complex Demonstratives: A Quantificational Account argues against what I call the direct reference account of complex demonstratives (henceforth DRCD) and defends a quantificational account of complex demonstratives.

In two recent papers, Nathan Salmon has criticized one of the book's Cited by: Of treating pronouns as quantifier phrases, they claim in the Afterword 'Here is not the place to review the data' (p.

Why not. The book would have benefitted from a section or chapter on this. One reason for this lacuna may be that demonstratives can be used as modifiers in noun phrases (complex demonstratives), whereas pure indexicals Cited by: "The book contains a thorough account of the controversy over the semantics of complex demonstratives, and advances a sophisticated positive theory that will interest everyone working on the semantics of natural language."--Graeme Forbes, Department of Philosophy, Tulane University "In this extremely clear and closely argued book, Jeffrey C.

King claims that the majority view is mistaken: Complex demonstratives. Complex Demonstratives A Quantificational Account: موضوع کتاب دیجیتالی [ Language Arts & Disciplines] شابک (ISBN)تعداد صفحه: صفحه: ناشر (انتشارات) [ Bradford Books Author: Jeffrey C. King. In this book, the Complex Litigation Committee of the American College of Trial Lawyers identifies and unravels the legal and practical issues presented by demonstrative aids, and offers suggestions for their persuasive and proper use.

Editorial team. General Editors: David Bourget (Western Ontario) David Chalmers (ANU, NYU) Area Editors: David Bourget Gwen BradfordAuthor: Josh Dever. Complex demonstratives, which at a first pass we can think of as any expression of the form ‘that/this F’, pose a particular problem for the truth-conditional semanticist toiling on the border between referring and denoting: on the one hand, it would seem that they’re semantically closely linked to simple demonstratives, standardly taken.

In his book, Jeffrey King revolts against such theories and suggests that complex demonstratives (of the form "that N'") are in fact context-sensitive quantifiers rather than referential expressions.

This core idea is introduced in Chapter 1 ("Against Direct Reference Accounts"). This book presents the first large-scale analysis of demonstratives from a cross-linguistic and diachronic perspective.

It is based on a representative sample of 85 languages. The first part of the book analyzes demonstratives from a synchronic point of view, examining their morphological structures, semantic features, syntactic functions, and. Demonstrative series in other languages.

Latin had several sets of demonstratives, including hic, haec, hoc ("this near me"); iste, ista, istud ("that near you"); and ille, illa, illud ("that over there") – note that Latin has not only number, but also three grammatical third set of Latin demonstratives (ille, etc.), developed into the definite articles in most Romance languages.

Abstract. Complex demonstratives 1 are phrases like ‘that woman’, ‘this book’, ‘that man wearing the polka dot trousers’, ‘those rocks’, ‘these apples’, ‘those apples that you left on those rocks beside that man wearing the polka dot trousers’, and so on.

Syntactically, they are determiner phrases. When we consider the semantic profile of complex demonstratives, however Author: Graham Stevens.Demonstrative pronouns can be used in place of a noun, so long as the noun being replaced can be understood from the pronoun’s context. Although this concept might seem a bit confusing at first, the following examples of demonstrative pronouns will add clarity.Complex demonstratives, that is, noun phrases of the form `that F ', have received particular attention in recent times largely because it has been thought that they pose problems for the traditional account of direct reference, inaugurated by David Kaplan (`Demonstratives', manuscript, ; published in J.

Almog, J. Perry and H. Wettstein (eds), Themes from Kaplan, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ).